Block Printing

In my post about Restful Bedrooms, I shared photos of sheets and blankets with subdued, soothing block print patterns. The designs mix very large prints with tiny prints:

Border prints are also used near top edges of blankets and sheets:

Whenever we’re ready to move beds into the apartment, I intend to design and print my own bedding to attempt this look. I love the contrast of large and small prints with ample white space between. And, I love hands-on design projects!

So I’ll be on a mission to collect the following wooden blocks for printing:

  • Enormous paisley
  • Tiny evenly-spaced print
  • Border floral with open airy feel
  • Medium-size florals

You can find a variety of wood blocks of all designs online: new blocks, vintage or antique blocks, and even custom blocks made just for you. Here are paisley wooden blocks, custom made by Colouricious:

I may need to go the bespoke route for paisley blocks large enough for an enormous print, if I don’t find affordable and quality ones online.

Here’s the kind of block that would make small evenly-spaced prints:

Here are border blocks for sale on etsy.com in by seller textileblocks:

You could combine several border prints to make a bigger border.

Other blogs have shared stories about block printing that have inspired me:

  • Once Upon A Tea Time shares some history of block printing, and photographed pieces from her collection in dreamy photos that can send you to a fantasyland of gorgeous printed fabrics.
  • Artnlight shares stories of block printing in Bhuj, along with the most luscious photos of wooden blocks. Yes, this blog’s photography makes wooden blocks look luscious!
  • Ro Bruhn shows an energizing mix of layered colors and stamps, including a demo of block printing on artwork.
  • Blau Druck shows indigo textile printing with 300-year-old wood blocks. This person has collected about 460 wood blocks. I’m so envious of the creativity and inspiration that must be in one place to use! Thus far I have only one. To be shown in a future post. 

Hanging Ceiling Lamps

I’m obsessing over this ceiling lamp we saw today in a shop on South Congress in Austin, Texas:

It’s made in Morocco. The designs are made with henna.  It would bring mysterious and exotic atmosphere to any room where it’s hanging.

Below are a few more examples from around the Internet. I think the colors and design of something like these would mix well with the future decor of our India pied a terre.

From justmorocco.com:

Another example from justmorocco.com:

From moroccancaravan.com:

From homestead.com:

From justmorocco.com:

From Planet Nomad, here’s a traveler’s shot of a hanging lamp in Morocco, looking from the floor straight up at the lamp and the fantasically-decorated ceiling:

Here is how these hanging lamps can enhance the atmosphere of rooms. These stylish rooms are at the Dar Les Cigognes, a boutique hotel in Marrakech, Morocco:

I must warn, these are animal skins stretched over frames, then decorated with henna designs. The curvier shapes and the henna drawings that are more intricate and complicated look more elegant to my eyes.

Wood Beams

For our Chennai flat, we’re designing a kitchen with Tuscan elements. One element I really like about Tuscan kitchens are wood beams on the ceilings:

I am thrilled that the people finishing our place “get it” when we share ideas with them. They’re going to put wood beams on our kitchen ceiling, and make the beams look old, like this place has been there for hundreds of years. Here’s a picture that my sister-in-law took in Paris a few years ago. Of wood beams! Something about the beams drew her eye. So she shared this with the designer and he’s going to make our beams look old like this:

To find inspiration from Tuscan kitchens, explore photos of the villas for rent at to-tuscany.com. We rented a small house for a week in Tuscany via this website, and it was a wonderful experience. We want to try to capture some of the feeling from that week.